Inside a Google data center

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What Engineers Found When They Tore Apart Tesla's Model 3

Oct.17 -- Tesla's Model 3 boasts the best technology and motor of any electric vehicle, but a team of engineers in Detroit say there's a major flaw in the car's design that's hurting Tesla's profit margins. Bloomberg Television's Ed Ludlow reports.

Praggnanandhaa vs Vishy Anand | Tata Steel Chess India Blitz 2018

This is the first time that Vishy Anand and Praggnanandhaa faced each other in over the board play! Pragg went for an ambitious approach and attacked Vishy's king relentlessly. Anand defended with all his might! What happened next? Who won the game? Check out the video to find out! Video: ChessBase India #chess #ChessBaseIndia #tschessindia ---------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to the ChessBase India Channel on YouTube for more informative and exciting videos! --------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to ChessBase India on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ChessBaseIndiachannel Check out chessbase.in for quality news and updates: http://chessbase.in Find all latest ChessBase DVD, Quality Chess books and other accessories: https://chessbase.in/online-shop/ You may also buy from ChessBase India storefront in Amazon India: https://amzn.to/2vv0XXy ------------------------------------ ChessBase India on Social Media ------------------------------------ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChessbaseIndia Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chessbaseindia/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chessbaseindia --------------------------------------------- In case of any questions feel free to reach out to our team at chessbaseindia@gmail.com

Security and Data Protection in a Google Data Center

This video tour of a Google data center highlights the security and data protections that are in place at our data centers.

What is 5G? | CNBC Explains

5G is a new, faster network with the potential to completely transform the internet. So what makes it so revolutionary? CNBC’s Tom Chitty explains. ----- Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://cnb.cx/2wuoARM Subscribe to CNBC Life on YouTube: http://cnb.cx/2wAkfMv Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/cnbcinternational Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cnbcinternational/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CNBCi

Physics: Crystals 1958 Alan Holden - Bell Laboratories - PSSC Physical Science Study Committee

Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney Physical Science Study Committee Films (PSSC) playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_KuXqv0QzMoNQYgR_nBxETx Physics & Physical Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_JKIMNk88rKCkhpK73_qmHY "Explains how crystals are formed and why they are shaped as they are. Considers their actual growth under a microscope, how they may be grown, and the relation of these phenomena to the concept of atoms. From the PSSC Physics series. Blue Ribbon winner, American Film Festival." Your instructor is Alan Holden of Bell Laboratories. Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ A crystal or crystalline solid is a solid material whose constituents, such as atoms, molecules or ions, are arranged in a highly ordered microscopic structure, forming a crystal lattice that extends in all directions. In addition, macroscopic single crystals are usually identifiable by their geometrical shape, consisting of flat faces with specific, characteristic orientations. The scientific study of crystals and crystal formation is known as crystallography. The process of crystal formation via mechanisms of crystal growth is called crystallization or solidification. The word crystal is derived from the Ancient Greek word κρύσταλλος (krustallos), meaning both “ice” and “rock crystal”, from κρύος (kruos), "icy cold, frost". Examples of large crystals include snowflakes, diamonds, and table salt. Most inorganic solids are not crystals but polycrystals, i.e. many microscopic crystals fused together into a single solid. Examples of polycrystals include most metals, rocks, ceramics, and ice. A third category of solids is amorphous solids, where the atoms have no periodic structure whatsoever. Examples of amorphous solids include glass, wax, and many plastics... The scientific definition of a "crystal" is based on the microscopic arrangement of atoms inside it, called the crystal structure. A crystal is a solid where the atoms form a periodic arrangement. (Quasicrystals are an exception, see below.) Not all solids are crystals. For example, when liquid water starts freezing, the phase change begins with small ice crystals that grow until they fuse, forming a polycrystalline structure. In the final block of ice, each of the small crystals (called "crystallites" or "grains") is a true crystal with a periodic arrangement of atoms, but the whole polycrystal does not have a periodic arrangement of atoms, because the periodic pattern is broken at the grain boundaries. Most macroscopic inorganic solids are polycrystalline, including almost all metals, ceramics, ice, rocks, etc. Solids that are neither crystalline nor polycrystalline, such as glass, are called amorphous solids, also called glassy, vitreous, or noncrystalline. These have no periodic order, even microscopically. There are distinct differences between crystalline solids and amorphous solids: most notably, the process of forming a glass does not release the latent heat of fusion, but forming a crystal does. A crystal structure (an arrangement of atoms in a crystal) is characterized by its unit cell, a small imaginary box containing one or more atoms in a specific spatial arrangement. The unit cells are stacked in three-dimensional space to form the crystal. The symmetry of a crystal is constrained by the requirement that the unit cells stack perfectly with no gaps. There are 219 possible crystal symmetries, called crystallographic space groups. These are grouped into 7 crystal systems, such as cubic crystal system (where the crystals may form cubes or rectangular boxes, such as halite shown at right) or hexagonal crystal system (where the crystals may form hexagons, such as ordinary water ice)...

Joe Kava, VP of Google's Data Center Operations, gives a tour inside a Google data center, and shares details about the security, sustainability and the core architecture of Google's infrastructure.

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